Improvisation by Ian Brighton. 2014 Recorded and Mixed by Paul Brighton. Mastered by Kevin Smith at Foundry Studios. Contains excerpts from Brian Morton interview with Derek Bailey, used by permission. Thanks. Recorded as part of a 4 track EP of Improvisations for my 70th birthday celebrations.

  

louxosenjoyables:

Yusef Lateef - Come Sunday

  

colinresponse:

sister-ari:

Bay Area Classic.

Rest In Peace Lofty

FBF. Tip o the cap to my brethren from the 707 Jeimeezy.

vnylst:

Beat Swap Meet, Chinatown, DTLA.

 

vnylst:

Beat Swap Meet, Chinatown, DTLA.

 

mitambor:

Las Alegres Ambulancias - Chimakongo

from San Basilio de Palenque, Colombia

Had the privilege of staying with these musician when I visited San Basilio de Palenque during the Festival of the Drum, last October

ardora:

Elizabeth Catlett, “I have given the world my songs" (1947)

ardora:

Elizabeth Catlett, “I have given the world my songs" (1947)

lessonsoftoday:

Elizabeth Catlett - Singing Their Songs

additional info:

Elizabeth Catlett’s art centers on the black female experience. In her prints and many of her sculptures, she focuses on developing compositions with multiple figures.Singing Their Songs is one of six lithographs that Catlett made to illustrate the poem “For My People,” written in 1937 by her friend, author Margaret Walker. The first line of Walker’s poem refers to black people “everywhere/singing their slave songs repeatedly”; it also describes people kneeling in prayer. Catlett has illustrated both actions. By varying the scale of her figures and separating them into registers, Catlett suggests that these men and women represent the African American experience in different times and places.Catlett’s figurative sculptures feature supple shapes, clean lines, and few details. She observed: “Printmaking had to do with the moment. I thought of sculpture as something more durable and timeless, and I felt that it had to be more general in the idea I was trying to express.” The intense colors, textured backgrounds, and strong patterns in Singing Their Songs demonstrate Catlett’s view of printmaking as a highly dynamic and flexible medium. - See more at: http://www.nmwa.org/works/singing-their-songs#sthash.oDVbdKRq.dpuf

lessonsoftoday:

Elizabeth Catlett - Singing Their Songs

additional info:

Elizabeth Catlett’s art centers on the black female experience. In her prints and many of her sculptures, she focuses on developing compositions with multiple figures.

Singing Their Songs is one of six lithographs that Catlett made to illustrate the poem “For My People,” written in 1937 by her friend, author Margaret Walker. The first line of Walker’s poem refers to black people “everywhere/singing their slave songs repeatedly”; it also describes people kneeling in prayer. Catlett has illustrated both actions. By varying the scale of her figures and separating them into registers, Catlett suggests that these men and women represent the African American experience in different times and places.

Catlett’s figurative sculptures feature supple shapes, clean lines, and few details. She observed: “Printmaking had to do with the moment. I thought of sculpture as something more durable and timeless, and I felt that it had to be more general in the idea I was trying to express.” The intense colors, textured backgrounds, and strong patterns in Singing Their Songs demonstrate Catlett’s view of printmaking as a highly dynamic and flexible medium. - See more at: http://www.nmwa.org/works/singing-their-songs#sthash.oDVbdKRq.dpuf

mishthi:

I am a huge fan and “regular” of the L.A. based party - Discostan. It’s at this seedy bar once a month where the two DJs Arshia Haq and Jeremy Loudenback spin disco-era music from the Maghrib to the Dis/Orient.
Check out Discostan radio (collaged together by Arshia) on their Soundcloud stream. And to get an idea of the sounds behind the Discostan, listen to this hour long Best Of Discostan mixtape. 

Discostan is a collective of artists curating sound, image and text from an imagined federation of states spanning the regions of Eastern Europe, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia and eastward to the edge of the earth – from Beirut to Bangkok via Bombay. Narrative threads include migration, celebration, warfare, nostalgia, homeland, borders, often within realms of Islamic influence, through the lenses of timeless traditional forms, the kaleidoscopic reinventions of pop culture, and everything in between and beyond. Most simply, Discostan is a love letter to the Dis-Orient.  [concertzender]

mishthi:

I am a huge fan and “regular” of the L.A. based party - Discostan. It’s at this seedy bar once a month where the two DJs Arshia Haq and Jeremy Loudenback spin disco-era music from the Maghrib to the Dis/Orient.

Check out Discostan radio (collaged together by Arshia) on their Soundcloud stream. And to get an idea of the sounds behind the Discostan, listen to this hour long Best Of Discostan mixtape.

Discostan is a collective of artists curating sound, image and text from an imagined federation of states spanning the regions of Eastern Europe, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia and eastward to the edge of the earth – from Beirut to Bangkok via Bombay. Narrative threads include migration, celebration, warfare, nostalgia, homeland, borders, often within realms of Islamic influence, through the lenses of timeless traditional forms, the kaleidoscopic reinventions of pop culture, and everything in between and beyond. Most simply, Discostan is a love letter to the Dis-Orient.  [concertzender]

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shutup-beavis:

Augustus Pablo - Thunder Clap